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The Biggest Health Trends of 2017 Slideshow

The Biggest Health Trends of 2017 Slideshow



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Find out what everyone was talking about in wellness this year

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The Biggest Health Trends of 2017

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2017 was a big year for wellness. The truth about carbs was revealed, people got creative in their low-sugar kitchens, and everyone stopped trying to limit their fats (though maybe that last one has gone a little too far).

Instagram is transforming the food scene, and more than ever you can track the progress of wellness conversations on a simple social media app. Whenever a new diet trend arises, there’s a hashtag. Whenever a new café pops up with an innovative use for avocados, Instagram is already on it. The new Instagram story function has allowed bloggers and influencers to detail their daily practices and rituals to devout followers, teaching people how to make their own collagen waffles and protein oats.

Through this platform, alongside many others, we’ve assessed which trends were really popping this year. Health and fitness are changing all the time — it can be tough to keep up. But now that 2017 has very nearly run its course, we can identify the biggest health trends of this year.

Adaptogens

These new wellness elixirs are herbs and other plants with medicinal properties. Many are meant to reduce stress and balance hormones naturally. Stress has been on everyone’s brain this year, especially in the wellness space. Research has erupted showing the many health effects of having too much stress in the body, so these herbs have made a breakthrough in health conversation. Reishi mushrooms, ashwaganda, and ginseng are some of the most popular.

‘Better’ Carb Swaps

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The “good carb, bad carb” debate was in full swing this year as the anxiety around gluten continued. People strayed away from white and wheat bread and opted instead for “healthier” options such as chickpea pasta, sweet potato toast, and paleo nut bread. Of course, now the prevailing research is showing that (for the vast majority of people) gluten was never harmful in the first place. But the trend has stuck, regardless.

Bone Broth

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Last year, no one had even heard of bone broth, but this year there are entire trendy cafés dedicated to it. This warm, savory beverage is no longer just for cooking. Now, people are drinking it plain, fawning over the health benefits the rich drink has to offer. Health gurus rumor that the broth can boost bone health, immunity, gut health, and sleep.

Collagen

People are adding this stuff to everything. We’re not exaggerating — to-go packets of flavorless collagen have transformed on-the-go nutrition, so people can add collagen to their coffee, soup, smoothies, and pretty much anything else. Collagen cupcakes are a casual thing on Instagram, and influencers everywhere claim to experience miraculous benefits after adding it to their diets. They claim to feel fuller for longer, have stronger hair and nails, and even rid themselves of constant cravings. It’s amazing what a little protein can do.

Dessert Alternatives

Courtesy of Halo Top

People have gone wild with what Whole 30 participants call “sex with your pants on,” or #SWYPO. Basically, it’s what happens when you try to replace real dessert with something that’s clearly much less satisfying.

Faced with all the warnings about sugar and carbs, people tossed out their regular cookies, cake, and brownies. Instead, people in the wellness world have transformed desserts into low-sugar, all-natural imitations of your usual suspects. Think sugar-free cookies, raw paleo cheesecake, and low-calorie ice cream. Halo Top, a diet-friendly ice cream replacement, surpassed every other ice cream company in sales this year.

Essential Oils

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These aromas have been popularly used in massage therapy and other spa treatments for ages, but at-home wellness has caught on to their benefits this year. Essential oil diffusers and subscription services are becoming popular for those interested in stress relief, mental health, and getting more sleep. The hormonal benefits are appealing to many health enthusiasts, as well, and many have gotten creative with how to use these blends. Cooking with essential oils has been revealed to have benefits, as well, and many chefs and food bloggers have begun to try it.

Food Intolerances

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High-Fat Lattes

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Dave Asprey, the mastermind behind Bulletproof, popularized the first high-fat latte with his bulletproof coffee. Essentially, the coffees are a blend of your typical espresso with coconut oil, butter, and dairy-free milk. He defended his creation with the assertion that these fats have many health benefits, an iteration of the healthy fat trend that made it to beverages.

This trend paved the way for golden milk, bulletproof matcha lattes, and many more drinks that are loaded with extra fat. Only in 2017 would people think it was normal to roast oil-free vegetables yet eating them with a side of a butter beverage.

Ketogenic Diet

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Everyone and her mother will by now have heard of the popular keto diet. Described as a “lifestyle” rather than a diet (though it definitely is one), “going keto” means cutting out virtually all the carbs from your day and replacing them with high-fat foods. When deprived of carbohydrates, your body is more likely to go into ketosis, a state in which it resorts to using fat for fuel that produces ketones. These ketones are rumored to lower your blood sugar, improve mental focus, and regulate hunger. However, many report feeling sluggish, experiencing reduced athletic performance, feeling their digestion is disrupted, and developing a disordered relationship with food.

Some companies have tried to replicate ketosis for people who don’t want to cut out carbs, but these drinks have attracted some skepticism. The keto diet doesn’t seem to be going anywhere anytime soon, especially when the number of products and recipes to help those who are on the diet stick to it are increasing by the day.

Paleo Diet

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The paleo and the keto diet are two sides of the same coin. Spinoffs of the low-carb, gluten-free fads of years past, both diets demonize refined carbohydrates and opt instead for different sources of calories. The paleo diet focuses on meat, fruit, nuts, and vegetables, claiming to imitate the diets of our human ancestors.

By following the plan, paleo dieters end up eating large amounts of protein and unsaturated fats alongside large amounts of fiber and small amounts of carbohydrates. Fruit intake is limited and is the primary source of carbs.

This diet is also popularized as a “lifestyle” — though, again, it’s 100 percent a diet — and is popular among yogis, health enthusiasts, and even parents. No grains are allowed, no yogurt, no cheese, and no beans. We’re bummed out just thinking about it.

Plant-Based Diets

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Whether it’s for your health or environmental activism purposes, everyone’s been going plant-based. Celebrities like Ne-Yo, Jason Derulo, and Craig Robinson have all gone vegan and thousands of Americans have made the swap, as well.

The fearmongering film What the Health scared people into eliminating eggs from their diet with the questionable claim that eating an egg is worse than smoking cigarettes. But regardless of whether that film held any ground in reality, people have been feeling the benefits from eating plant-based. Even elementary schools have jumped on the bandwagon, serving only meatless options at lunch.

Plant Water

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Water wasn’t enough to hydrate people this year. Instead, other more hydrating drinks have made their way onto shelves. Maple water, watermelon water, chlorophyll water, and other plant-infused varieties of nature’s favorite beverage have made it onto the shelves and seriously succeeded at gaining public attention. The drinks flaunt health bonuses like electrolytes, antioxidants, and other nutrients that boost the benefit of just drinking water.

Probiotics

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There’s been so much buzz about gut health this year. Most of it is total BS, but the health conversation did get something right — we do have symbiotic gut bacteria, and when we feed them well there are health benefits. These bacteria can be ingested in foods with probiotics, such as kimchi or yogurt, or fed with nourishing whole foods as part of a healthy diet.

There are many who have taken the trend too far — refusing to eat sugar because it feeds “bad” gut bacteria, eliminating food groups for invented intolerances, and other drastic solutions to minute problems such as bloating and indigestion. But hopefully in the years to come, research will help clear the fog around this trendy health topic.

Sugar Detoxes

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The terror around sugar is growing. While moderate amounts of sugar intake have never been proven harmful by any study, excessive amounts of sugar can lead to insulin resistance, cancer, and other serious health problems. In a nationwide knee-jerk reaction to these discoveries, many have taken to eliminating sugar from their diets entirely, at least for a time. Sugar detoxes sponsored by nutritionists and health coaches are blowing up on social media. The idea is that by eliminating sugar, you can “reset” your cravings and eliminate your sugar addiction — which is a total myth, anyway, but alas.

Sugar-Free Baking

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Sugar-free desserts, no-fruit smoothies, and other solutions to sweets cravings are getting creative in how to be compliant with the sugar detox mindset. The effort to keep eating cookies while detoxing has gotten a bit desperate, resulting in an explosion of sugar-free desserts on the internet. There are entire books of recipes for no-sugar desserts now. But are these desserts really all that healthier than just indulging in a cookie and moving on with your life?

Toast

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People are acting like this is the best thing since sliced bread. It’s gone far beyond avocado toast; finally finding creative ways to use their favorite carb. Sometimes it’s plain old bread — but sweet potato toast, paleo bread toast, and other low-carb versions of your classic buttered loaf have been more popular than the original. Toppings like yogurt, granola, chopped up snack bars, and other unexpected choices have replaced just butter and jam. The new inventiveness people have felt with the trend has allowed #toasttuesday to surpass even #tacotuesday on Instagram every week.

Virtual Reality Fitness

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At-home workouts never have to be boring again. Technology has turned your workout into a video game. Bike races, dance parties, outdoor jogs, and so much more are possible with the use of a virtual reality headset you wear while you move in your living room. The headsets can connect you with other fit people, trainers, and experts to give you a community alongside your indoor experience.

Wellness Shots

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Forget tequila shots — though they do have some health benefits. The new trendy shot to take is a wellness shot, like wheatgrass, turmeric, or matcha. There are different shots blended for different health needs. If you’re sick, for example, you could take an immunity-boosting shot. If you want to reduce inflammation, there’s a shot for that, too. The tiny drinks are sold at juice shops and normally sell for around $5 each. We’re not really sure how we feel about this one — we’d rather eat our turmeric instead.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.


The Decade in Food: Trends from 2000 to 2010

Carrie Bradshaw hits New York City's cupcake mecca Magnolia Bakery on Sex and the City, igniting the cupcake trend. Over the next several years, popular New York- and Los Angeles-based cupcake shops like Crumbs and Sprinkles expand into multi-state franchises local cupcakeries sprout up on street corners galore and by 2009, the number of new cupcake cookbooks reaches what Publishers Weekly calls a "deluge."

Craving mini bundles of cakey goodness? Bake up Martha Stewart's best cupcake recipes.

2001: The Rise of Rachael Ray

In the fall of 2001, America meets accessible Rachael Ray as 30 Minute Meals debuts on Food Network. Today Ray's empire includes her eponymous magazine, Everyday with Rachael Ray a nationally syndicated talk show cookware and branded EVOO (extra virgin olive oil, for those not familiar with the Ray lexicon). As it did with Ray, the Food Network helps propel a new generation of effervescent, telegenic chefs &mdash from Paula Deen to Guy Fieri &mdash to multimedia celebrity over the course of the decade.

After the country suffered one of its worst disasters on September 11, 2001, Americans turned to meatloaf, chicken pot pie, mac 'n cheese, pizza, and all things comforting.

The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss by cardiologist Arthur Agatston is published in 2003 and remains on the best-seller list for more than 96 consecutive weeks. Agatston's carbohydrate-reducing plan is just one facet of the low-carb craze sweeping the nation. In February 2004, nearly one in 10 respondents to one survey said they were following a low-carb diet by 2005, that number dropped to 2% and the trend faded.

2004: The End of Super-Sizing

Super Size Me, first-time director Morgan Spurlock's documentary film in which he undergoes a self-imposed experiment to eat fast food exclusively for one month, makes its way to theaters. In the movie, Spurlock's Golden Arches diet leads to a weight gain of nearly 30 pounds, a major hike in his cholesterol level, and other effects ranging from liver damage to sexual dysfunction. Mickey D's ends its super-sizing menu that year.

Coffee Goliath Starbucks achieves world domination as the number of its coffeehouses surpasses 10,000 (today there are over 16,000 worldwide!). Never mind the 50-cent diner coffee: Many Americans' mornings are no longer complete without a $5 venti nonfat Caramel Macchiato and its ilk.

2006: Organic Overflow

The organic food movement goes mainstream in a big way when Wal-Mart jumps on the bandwagon, stocking quality organic products at good ole Wal-Mart prices: just 10% more than their conventional foods. According to the Organic Trade Association, annual sales of organic food hit $24 billion by 2009, a more than fivefold increase from a decade earlier.

2007: Eat Local and Sustainable

Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma is released, revealing the scary truth behind industrial food production in the U.S. and encouraging Americans to source food from local farms. Soon sustainability &mdash limiting one's harmful impact on the earth and environment &mdash and "locavore" enter the mainstream food vocabulary.

Holy whole grains! In 2008 more than 2,800 new whole grain products are introduced to the worldwide market, a 1,658% increase over the year 2000.

2009: Recession Recipes

In the wake of 2009's economic recession, families tighten their budgets by packing brown bag lunches and preparing home-cooked meals. According to a recent Zagat survey, 61% of 6,708 people polled revealed they are cooking more at home as a direct result of the economic downturn.

2010 was the year of the ramblin' restaurant. From Los Angeles to Portland to Austin to New York, food trucks dominated the restaurant scene with forward-thinking flavors.

What's Next?: Jetsons-esque Technology

It seems none of us can function without checking our Blackberrys, iPhones, Kindles, or GPS. Technology is touching every aspect of our lives: supermarkets, kitchens, drive-thrus, and fine-dining restaurants where touch-screen menus are being introduced. Will the iPad mean the end of the paper menu? Only time will tell. But our bet is that diners will be seeing more gadgets at the table in addition to inside their very own kitchens.