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Rice Pilaf with Apples and Pumpkin Seeds Recipe

Rice Pilaf with Apples and Pumpkin Seeds Recipe



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Rice Pilaf with Apples and Pumpkin Seeds

This rice pilaf is exceptional served with chicken, game birds, and fish, especially salmon in beurre blanc. Easy to prepare, delicious to eat, and full of healthy fiber and minerals from the pumpkin seeds, this is one of my favorite seasonal menu items.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 shallot, chopped
  • 1/2 cup carrot, diced
  • 1/2 cup apple, diced
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1/8 cup shelled pumpkin seeds
  • 1 cup brown and wild rice blend, such as Organic Harvest Medley
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Servings2

Calories Per Serving531

Folate equivalent (total)110µg28%

Riboflavin (B2)0.5mg27.1%


Curried Brown Rice with Pumpkin Seeds, Apricots and Spinach

Brown rice gets a flavor burst when curry powder, onions, and dried apricots are added. Toasted pumpkin seeds add a nice crunch.


Spicy Mince and Risoni Pilaf

Spicy Mince and Risoni Pilaf is a simple and easy dinner recipe I decided to share with you today. Aren&rsquot we always on the lookout for those?

A pilaf is originally rice cooked in a spicy broth, like chicken or vegetable stock with spices, and mixed with finely chopped cooked onion or other vegetables.

For my pilaf I decided to use pasta rice. It is a small grain like pasta and actually looks a bit like rice. It doubles in volume, and cooked in a delicious spicy vegetable stock, it ends up being flavoursome and mouthwatering. I added spicy cooked mince, with garlic, onion, green pepper and fresh basil.

Brighten it up by adding chopped carrots or celery, and serve it with a dollop of sour cream or sweet chutney.

t really is as easy as that! Mince is such a versatile ingredient &ndash I am sure all of you reading this have minced beef in the freezer. An easy and fuss free recipe, that you can tweak and change to your liking! Enjoy!


Roasted Pie Pumpkins with Wild Rice, Apple & Kale Stuffing

Fill sweet pumpkins with this delicious rice pilaf before roasting. It makes a stunning side dish and can also be enjoyed as a turkey stuffing! Roasted pie pumpkins with wild rice, apple & kale stuffing is a great way to take advantage of pumpkin season and serve a beautiful fall festive meal.

  • 2 small pie pumpkins
  • 1 tbsp (15 mL) canola or olive oil, for cooking
  • Stuffing:
  • 4 cups (1 L) chicken or vegetable stock or water
  • 1 cup (250 mL) wild rice
  • 1 cup (250 mL) brown rice
  • 1/2 tsp. (2 mL) salt
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) dried cranberries, chopped dried apricots or raisins
  • 1/3 cup (85 mL) butter or oil
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 1 tart apple, cored and diced
  • 3-4 kale leaves, roughly chopped (discard stems)
  • 1 Tbsp. (15 mL) finely chopped fresh sage (or 1 tsp. dried)
  • 2 tsp. (10 mL) finely chopped fresh thyme (or 1/2 tsp. dried)
  • 1/2 tsp. (2 mL) freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) chopped pecans, toasted (optional)
  1. For the pumpkins:
  2. Prepare the pumpkins by cutting off the top – cut it flat, right where the pumpkin curves in, so that you maximize the open area. Scoop out the seeds and stingy insides with a spoon, discarding them.
  3. Drizzle inside the pumpkin with oil and use your hands to rub it all over the inside to coat. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Microwave for 5-10 minutes, until the pumpkin flesh is just tender, but not too soft.
  4. For the stuffing:
  5. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F. Bring the stock or water to a simmer in a large saucepan add the rice and salt, reduce heat to low and cook, covered, until the rice is tender, about 45 minutes. Remove from the heat and fluff with a fork, adding the cranberries.
  6. In a large skillet, heat the butter or oil over medium-high heat and sauté the onion and celery until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the apple and kale and cook for a few more minutes, until the apples begin to soften and the kale wilts. Add to the rice mixture along with the sage, thyme, pepper and pecans.
  7. Use the mixture to stuff the prepared pumpkins, filling them as much as you can. Cover loosely with foil and return to the oven for about 30 minutes, until heated through. To serve, cut into wedges and serve each wedge with a spoonful of the rice pilaf.

Julie Van Rosendaal is the author of 7 best-selling cookbooks. She’s the food and nutrition guide on the Calgary Eyeopener on CBC Radio One, the food editor of Parents Canada magazine, and a columnist and contributor for several other local and national publications, including Western Living, Swerve, the Calgary Herald, Avenue magazine and City Palate. She is perhaps best known as the voice behind her blog, DinnerwithJulie.com, which documents life in her home kitchen in Calgary with her husband and 9 year old son.

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Fall Wild Rice Pilaf

Fall into fall with this eye-catching recipe! This Fall Wild Rice Pilaf is a gluten-free nutritious grain bowl featuring U.S.-grown Wild Rice, and it makes a wonderful side dish. It’s a sure hit for more than just the holidays.

Ingredients

Step 1

Step 2

Toss the delicata squash, cauliflower, and butternut squash with the avocado oil and salt and pepper. Roast for about 15-20 minutes, tossing halfway through.

Step 3

In the meantime, cook the wild rice according to package directions on the stove or in a rice cooker.

Step 4

Prepare the apples, chickpeas and kale. Slightly massaging the kale with a little bit of oil so that it softens. Next, prepare the pumpkin vinaigrette by whisking all of the ingredients together in a small bowl.

Step 5

Once the rice has cooked and the veggies have roasted, toss everything together, topping with pumpkin seeds and parmesan cheese last followed by the vinaigrette and enjoy!


Simple Autumn Rice Pilaf

This simple autumn rice pilaf is a delicious gluten-free alternative to traditional stuffing. Simple & ready in 20 minutes so you can enjoy the flavor of the season!

  • Author:Tiffany
  • Prep Time: 10 mins
  • Cook Time: 20 mins
  • Total Time: 30 mins
  • Yield: 4 servings 1 x
  • Category: Sides
  • Method: Stove top cook
  • Cuisine: American

Ingredients

  • 1 cup jasmine rice, uncooked
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock (how to make homemade)
  • 3 Tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1/2 large onion, diced
  • 1 cup mushrooms, diced (about 2oz )
  • 2 – 3 loosely packed cups spinach or baby kale
  • 1/4 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • salt & pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Prepare one cup of rice according to the directions on the package, substituting chicken stock for water.
  2. Meanwhile, melt butter (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium heat. When the butter begins to sizzle, add the onions and cook for 2 minutes. Add the mushrooms and continue to cook until the onions are nearly translucent. Season with salt & pepper.
  3. Add spinach. Stir often to cook, reducing heat if rice is not done yet.
  4. Add cinnamon, garlic powder, sunflower seeds and dried cranberries. Stir well.
  5. Fold in cooked rice. Take care to stir well, but not to over-stir so rice doesn’t become mushy.
  6. Taste and season with salt & pepper as needed.

Notes

Vegetarian Option: Substitute vegetable stock for chicken stock, and replace butter with coconut oil.
Dairy-free Option: Substitute butter with coconut oil.
Inspired by The Organic Kitchen.

Keywords: Autumn Rice Pilaf

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EASY RICE PILAF

You can use any leftover meat, and change spices to your taste, great way to use leftover rice.

  • 2 cups cooked rice
  • 1 onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic, mashed
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon cumin
  • ¼ cup of soya sauce
  • 2 tablespoons chilli sauce or 1 teaspoon chilli flakes
  • 2 spicy sausages, like cheese grillers chopped
  • 1 cup small mixed vegatbles or baby peas
  • 1 chicken fillet, cut into blocks
  • 5 rashers of bacon, cut into blocks
  • 1/2 cup of chicken stock
  • teaspoon of thyme (fresh if possible)

Fry onion and garlic in a little oil, add the chicken, bacon, and sausages (even chorizo), fry until chicken is just cooked through.
Add spices, soya and stock.
Cook until it reduces by half, then add the rice.
Cook and stir everything together till all the rice is covered in sauce, it must be just wet, no liquid at the bottom. Then stir in thyme and serve.


How to Use Pumpkin Seeds

Step-by-Step Pumpkin Seed How-To
Once you're done carving, don't throw out the seeds! All pumpkin seeds are edible, including the ones from your jack-o'-lantern.
Learn How to Roast and Flavor Pumpkin Seeds

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Why We Love Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin Seeds: A Healthy Snack
Packed with magnesium and zinc, an ounce of whole roasted pumpkin seeds only has 126 calories and 5 grams of fat, not to mention 5 grams of protein.
Learn More About the Health Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds

Roasting Pumpkin Seeds with Alton

Watch Alton Make Toasted Pumpkin Seeds
Alton shows you what to do with all those leftover seeds from pumpkin carving.
Alton's Toasted Pumpkin Seeds How-To

Alton's Pumpkin Seed Brittle
Replace peanuts with pumpkin seeds for an easy, crunchy homemade brittle.
Make Your Own Pumpkin Seed Candy

10_SA_FN_Pudding-002.tif

Pepita Rice Pudding
Pumpkin seeds add a crunchy, autumnal twist to this ultra-creamy rice pudding.
Try This Fall-Friendly Dessert

Sweet and Spicy Pepitas Popcorn Balls

Sweet and Spicy Pepitas Popcorn Balls
A hint of cayenne pepper and a handful of pumpkin seeds make these Halloween treats surprisingly addictive.
Make Popcorn Balls for Your Halloween Get-Together

Baby Spinach, Avocado and Pumpkin Seed Salad
Think of them as healthier croutons! Pumpkin seeds add crunch to any salad.
Add Pumpkin Seeds to Your Salad

Bobby's Spiced-Up Pumpkin Seeds
Add a little Southwestern flare to this super simple fall snack.
Get Bobby's Spicy Pumpkin Seed Recipe

Sandra's Caramelized Pumpkin Seeds
Butterscotch and brown sugar provide the perfect toothsome coating.
Try Sandra's Sweet Pumpkin Seeds


1. Pumpkin Puree (6 Months+)

What’s the most basic thing made out of pumpkin that you could feed your baby? Pumpkin puree, of course! When cooked, pumpkin mashes beautifully, so you don’t really need a grinder. Leave some chunks as your baby gets older.

2. Pumpkin Apple Banana Puree (7 Months+)

This Pumpkin Apple Banana puree from Hanky’s Happy Home is the perfect stage 2 weaning food, once your baby has already tried pumpkins, apples and bananas separately. The best part is that all the ingredients are naturally sweet!

3. Pumpkin Leek and Chicken Puree (8 Months+)

Once you’re ready to take your regular pumpkin puree to the next level, check out this yummy chicken and vegetables combo from Mas & Pas. The leeks add a lovely color to the puree!

4. Amaranth Flour Pumpkin Porridge (6 Months+)

Amaranth is a super nutritious grain, but unfortunately it isn’t that common in Indian homes nowadays. Being gluten free, this is a great idea for babies who have trouble with wheat. Amaranth is also a rich source of iron and antioxidants.

5. Pumpkin Millet Porridge (8 Months+)

If you’ve been a reader of this blog you know we love millets! Eating Pleasure combines just two ingredients -pumpkin and millet – to create a simple and easily digestible millet porridge. Use a millet your baby is familiar with.

6. Pumpkin Soup (8 Months+)

With the weather getting colder, a soup is one of the best ways to get your little one to take in some nutrition along with fluids. GK Food Diary has a recipe for a creamy soup. You can skip the salt and mix in our Mixed Nuts Powder instead.

7. Pumpkin Baby Pancakes (8 Months+)

Pancakes are a popular option for baby led weaning, and these pumpkin pancakes from Brooklyn Farm Girl are no different! Make them healthier by using whole wheat flour and make them small enough for baby hands to hold.

8. Pumpkin Banana French Toast Sticks (8 Months+)

It is always interesting to see the different variations of French Toast and we’re loving this pumpkin version from Haute & Healthy Living! Use a milk of your choice, like coconut milk, almond milk or any other plant milk suitable for babies.

9. Pumpkin Blender Muffins (7 Months+)

If you thought making muffins would be a time consmuing job, you need to check out this recipe from Baby Foode! Made with a blender, these are super easy to prepare and are a great finger food option.

10. Pumpkin Pie Yogurt Dots (8 Months+)

Family Centsability gives us an easy recipe to make these dots from yogurt and pumpkin. The size and shape of these are good practice for your little one’s fine motor skills!

11. Pumpkin Basmati Rice (7 Months+)

Who says basmati rice is only for biryani? Baby Foode shows us a great way to incorporate it into baby food, adding pumpkin to make it creamy. This recipe is a great way to introduce spices to your baby.

12. Apple Pumpkin Baby Cookies (8 Months+)

Once your baby is older and enjoying chewing on harder foods, try out these pumpkin cookies from To & Fro Blog. All the recipe uses is apples, pumpkin and oats. Go with homemade almond milk, coconut milk or even formula.

13. Pumpkin Chia Baby Pudding (8 Months+)

Give baby an occasional treat with this Pumpkin chia pudding from Grabease. The pumpkin boosts immunity and adds natural sweetness and creaminess, while chia seeds aid in weight gain while also providing valuable minerals.

14. Pumpkin Sooji Fingers (8 Months+)

Looking for slightly crunchy finger food options for your baby? Check out our Pumpkin sooji fingers recipe, which will be fun for your little one to grasp and chew on!

Pumpkin Halwa for Babies (8 Months+)

With dates powder and dry fruits powder, this is a nutrient packed healthy dessert for little babies on festive occasions!

Oats Pumpkin Porridge for Babies (6 Months+)

This is the simplest pumpkin porridge you can feed your little one! Just use organic oats for maximum benefits and add fresh pumpkin and you’re all set to make it!

Pumpkin Mung Dal Porridge Recipe (8 Months+)

Little babies who’re exploring new flavors will enjoy this savory pumpkin porridge with garlic. The garlic also has healing benefits and can prevent against the common cold and cough.

Broken Wheat Pumpkin Porridge (8 Months+)

Broken wheat is a great food for babies to keep them full for longer, and now you can add pumpkin to the mix for some added Vitamins and minerals!


Replies

I like taking pumpkin, roasting it and then mixing that with sage, garlic, cream and parmesan cheese for a nice pumpkin alfredo sauce. Really fabulous to have with cubed zucchini and summer squash mixed with tortellini or ravioli and grilled chicken breast.

Also pureed pumpkin and applesauce make great substitutions for oil in baking recipes.

Pumpkin alfredo sauce? That sounds delicious. Oh my mouth is watering, I might have to try that.

Also loving the idea of an oil substitute! Thanks

I like taking pumpkin, roasting it and then mixing that with sage, garlic, cream and parmesan cheese for a nice pumpkin alfredo sauce. Really fabulous to have with cubed zucchini and summer squash mixed with tortellini or ravioli and grilled chicken breast.

Also pureed pumpkin and applesauce make great substitutions for oil in baking recipes.


This sounds absolutely delicious! Nice to see something other than "pumpkin-spice" everything in one of these threads! What temp/time/method do you use for roasting your pumpkin?

The big carving pumpkins aren't really meant for eating. I mean they're edible, but they're bland, watery, and stringy. I put my Jack-o-lantern pumpkins in the compost.

The smaller pie or sugar pumpkins are the ones you'd want for eating. I have roasted them, but I usually just buy the canned puree.

Whichever you choose Downeast Maine Pumpkin Bread is my favorite pumpkin recipe. You can replace up to half the oil with unsweetened applesauce if you like. And I double the cloves.

The big carving pumpkins aren't really meant for eating. I mean they're edible, but they're bland, watery, and stringy. I put my Jack-o-lantern pumpkins in the compost.

The smaller pie or sugar pumpkins are the ones you'd want for eating. I have roasted them, but I usually just buy the canned puree.

Whichever you choose Downeast Maine Pumpkin Bread is my favorite pumpkin recipe. You can replace up to half the oil with unsweetened applesauce if you like. And I double the cloves.


See, I did not know this. I really like the idea of pumpkin bread. I prefer savoury foods

The big carving pumpkins aren't really meant for eating. I mean they're edible, but they're bland, watery, and stringy. I put my Jack-o-lantern pumpkins in the compost.

The smaller pie or sugar pumpkins are the ones you'd want for eating. I have roasted them, but I usually just buy the canned puree.

Whichever you choose Downeast Maine Pumpkin Bread is my favorite pumpkin recipe. You can replace up to half the oil with unsweetened applesauce if you like. And I double the cloves.


See, I did not know this. I really like the idea of pumpkin bread. I prefer savoury foods

Yes, you definitely want to look for a pie, sugar, or Cinderella pumpkin. They are meant for eating.

I love pumpkin in many forms. One is to use it in a stew. I make a Chilean Chicken Stew with chicken, pumpkin, corn (on the cob) and green beans.

I also roast a pumpkin and puree the "meat". I then either use it to make cookies or dessert bars or freeze it for future baking. Oh, I also use it in pumpkin dinner rolls, much like Parker House Rolls, but with pumpkin.

Slice it, roast it and pop it on a bed of spinach with crumbled feta and dried cranberries and white balsamic vinaigrette. Or slice and roast it and mix it with brown rice and lentils along with a little pumpkin pie spice. This is also good with dried cranberries. Or cut just the top off and scoop out the seeds, roast it til soft, and fill it with stuff, like a rice pilaf, or sausage and chick peas, and mix in some savory sage and thyme. If you like winter squash (like butternut or acorn) you can use pumpkin for the same things. Also, there's tiger pumpkin which is white(ish) with little orange or green stripes. Very pretty, makes a great presentation, and the white flesh makes a really good alfredo addition.


I love pumpkin!! Japanese pumpkin in particular, it's called kabocha. Echoing someone earlier, the big carving pumpkins aren't really for eating! You should definitely take advantage of squash season though !

I actually made a blog post about a year ago. lemme go find it..

I never update it . but it has some of my favorite pumpkin recipes on there! Pumpkin granola and korean pumpkin soup .

Thanks for the blog! Oh my god my eyes are really being opened here. This is brilliant

Skinnytaste has an AWESOME collection of 50 healthy pumpkin recipes

My dad used to have us pick them out of the pumpkin guts so he could roast them with a little salt and pepper.

YUM! I'm so excited about this. I am making it my mission to get a pumpkin before the end of this week.

As for the seeds I love pumpkin seeds, raw, soaked, roasted with spices, in porridge, on their own, in salads. The seeds I can find no problem.

Slice it, roast it and pop it on a bed of spinach with crumbled feta and dried cranberries and white balsamic vinaigrette. Or slice and roast it and mix it with brown rice and lentils along with a little pumpkin pie spice. This is also good with dried cranberries. Or cut just the top off and scoop out the seeds, roast it til soft, and fill it with stuff, like a rice pilaf, or sausage and chick peas, and mix in some savory sage and thyme. If you like winter squash (like butternut or acorn) you can use pumpkin for the same things. Also, there's tiger pumpkin which is white(ish) with little orange or green stripes. Very pretty, makes a great presentation, and the white flesh makes a really good alfredo addition.


Watch the video: PILAV SA PILETINOM, ODLICAN RUCAK-DACINAA KUHINJA (August 2022).