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Black Cherry Chai Recipe

Black Cherry Chai Recipe



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Ingredients

  • 8 filthy black cherries
  • 1 1/2 Ounce Chai tea infused Hudson Valley Rye Whiskey
  • 1/2 Ounce fresh squeezed lemon
  • 1/2 Ounce honey syrup

Directions

*To make the chai tea infused Rye Whiskey, combine 1 tablespoon loose leaf chai tea with 8 ounces Woodford rye whiskey in a small jar. Let sit for 2 hours, strain the tea and transfer to a glass bottle before using.*

Place cherries in a cocktail shaker and muddle. Add tea infused Rye Whiskey, lemon and honey syrup to the cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Build this cocktail over ice and muddled cherries, shake for 10 seconds when all the ingredients have been added. Pour into rocks glass, Garnish with two cherries on a skewer.

Nutritional Facts

Servings1

Calories Per Serving173

Folate equivalent (total)4µg1%


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

If you've made this recipe, be sure to drop us a line down in the comment, leave a rating, and let us know how you liked it!


Masala Chai

Masala chai is a sweet and spicy drink that can be enjoyed all year round, served either piping hot from the stove or nice and chilled from the fridge. Originating in South Asia, most notably India and Pakistan, the delicious beverage is now popular all over the world. Simply translated, masala ("spice mix") chai ("tea") is spiced tea. There are many versions with varying amounts and ratios of ingredients, but at its core, masala chai is usually black tea brewed with fresh ginger, crushed spices, milk, and sugar.

This version of masala chai uses a combination of minty green cardamom, sweet cloves, licorice-y fennel seeds, spicy black peppercorns, and warm cinnamon and star anise in addition to grated fresh ginger. For extra depth, we recommend lightly toasting the whole spices before crushing them to help the flavors bloom during the simmer&mdashthis gives the chai a slight cocoa note. You can adjust the spice ratio to your liking: decrease the amount of black pepper and use sliced ginger instead of grated ginger to decrease spiciness, or increase cloves and cinnamon sticks for a sweeter profile.

Go with a solid, strong loose-leaf black tea for the richest chai. I used Taj Mahal brand orange pekoe, which is affordable and has only a slight acidity even when brewed for a long time. It works perfectly in this recipe, which calls for 20 minutes of low-heat simmering. If you'd prefer a less strong cup of tea, you can cut the total simmering time in half.

Milk and sugar

For the perfect cup of tea, you'll have to tweak the recipe to find your own perfect balance. I went with a 1:1 ratio of milk to water for my preferred level of creaminess. If you want it richer, replace some of the water with milk for a lighter version, replace some of the milk with water. Avoid using more than 3 cups of liquid total to prevent diluting the taste of the tea and spices too much.

Sugar is an essential ingredient in masala chai: 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetener will accentuate the taste of spices and deepens their flavors against the tannic bitterness of tea. If you're tempted to skip the sugar altogether, know that you'll risk muting the vibrant notes of spicy goodness!

Tea pulling

Watch almost any video of street food in India and you'll probably find a scene of a chai vendor pulling tea: the brew is poured back and forth between two pots from a great distance repeatedly until it turns slightly foamy. "Pulling" the chai aerates it in such a way that makes it taste smoother and creamier, giving it more body and a silkier mouthfeel. You can try to mimic this technique by using a ladle or metal measuring cup to scoop up some chai and pouring it back into the pot during the last few minutes of the simmering process&mdashjust beware, it might splatter a bit if you go too high!

When straining the tea, be sure to use a wooden spoon to really press on the tea and spices before discarding them&mdashthere's a lot of flavor trapped in those last drops! You can either serve this hot right away with a buttermilk scone or some fennel-spiced butter cookies, or keep it chilled in the fridge for up to 3 days. I find that the flavor intensifies once the chai is cool, making it that much more enjoyable.

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