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Popcorn with Nutritional Yeast and Aleppo Pepper

Popcorn with Nutritional Yeast and Aleppo Pepper



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This popcorn captures the essence of even the most addictive flavored chip or corn puff, without the dairy or fluorescent-orange food coloring.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
  • 1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper or crushed red pepper flakes
  • 8 cups just-popped popcorn (from ½ cup kernels)

Special Equipment

  • A spice mill or a mortar and pestle

Recipe Preparation

  • Finely grind nutritional yeast, Aleppo pepper, and salt in spice mill or with mortar and pestle.

  • Arrange popcorn on a rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with oil; toss to coat.

  • Sprinkle with some of the nutritional yeast mixture and toss well to coat, adding more nutritional yeast mixture to taste.

Related Video

Popcorn with Nutritional Yeast

Reviews SectionI made this over the weekend, and boy howdy, my husband and I both had the same reaction (and I do mean reaction). It burned, it made us cough and sneeze and our noses run. It was the absolute strangest thing. I've never had this experience eating anything else in my entire life. The nutritional yeast and pepper were going airborne as we chewed the popcorn, and would go up the back of our throats. It was *kind of* cheese flavored, but I would not describe it as Dorrito and even if it had been delicious, it was most definitely not worth the literal suffering.AnonymousCalifornia11/29/18legitimately delicious popcorn, probably the tastiest seasoned popcorn I've ever had.madmaddyGreenville, SC10/05/18I haven't actually tried this recipe yet, but plan to. Aleppo pepper is my newest favorite spice. Nice roasted peppery flavor without the heat. Now, what I was really interested in reading was dry popping. The really old school way back when I was a kid had mom put the oil in the biggest pot we had along with the popcorn kernels. Burner on high, lid on, then stand and wait until you heard the first pop. From that moment on, you'd move the pot back and forth over the burner grates continuously so none of the kernels sit in one place and burn. And if you were feeling brave enough, crack the lid open and do the shaking with the lid askew (while holding it down, of course). Yes, you get splatters that way, which mom didn't like, but it did release the steam and you had crisper popped corn. Dry popping without oil, then oil drizzled over the top?? I'm from Missouri (yes, really).motiger14975Columbia, MO USA10/03/18

Perfect Stovetop Popcorn

Popcorn is really easy to make at home and if, like me, you love going to the movies and stuffing handfuls of it into your gob, this is for you. No more staring through a foggy glass door at a brown paper bag, spinning on a space-age carousel. Wave goodbye to the familiar feeling of catching a whiff of burnt popcorn oozing out of the crack of the microwave. There’s only one route to consistently light, nutty, toasty, crunchy popcorn, and that’s via your stovetop.

We’ll cover what corn you can pop, the different fats you can use, what pot to pop in and most important of all, some different flavours you can use to adorn your corn. I’ve included a few of my favourites, including a mind-bending vegan chilli cheese popcorn. Yum.


“Cook This Book” by Molly Baz

Glamour: What four staples are always in your kitchen?

Molly Baz: Lemons, in abundance. I’m not talking one lemon—multiple lemons. Dill, the go-to herb. Sour cream. And hot sauce. When I say hot sauce I kind of mean the category of hot condiments. The spicy condiment department in my refrigerator is outrageously expansive.

What would you buy with $20 to spend at the farmers market?

It depends what the season is—in the summertime I’ll probably spend 16 of those dollars on tomatoes. And four of those dollars on some kind of beautiful greens that I can’t get in a supermarket. There’s so much out there that isn’t in the supermarket, and I love a beautiful, unique mix of lettuces, because I eat lots of salads along with my food and along with a lot more indulgent things. That’s like a treat for me—a lot of tomatoes and a little bit of lettuce.

What do you listen to while cooking?

Usually my husband curates the sounds in our space! He’s big into music, and I’m usually too caught up in my cooking world to remember to put anything on. He’s the vibes creator, and it’s different every night.

What do you drink while you cook?

There’s always a bottle of wine. I’m not really a cocktail-while-I-cook person, I just love the tradition of opening a bottle of wine with someone. Maybe this is too much, but a bottle of wine kind of feels like the perfect amount of wine for two people for a night. [Laughs.] We keep a lot of fun, interesting wines on hand.

What is your all-time favorite food?

Caesar salad—that’s not hard for me to answer. It’s the greatest I refer to it as the GSOAT, which is the Greatest Salad of All Time. It’s got it all.

What’s an edible impulse buy that you can never resist?

When I go to Trader Joe’s I can’t not purchase the Elote Corn Dippers, which are just like the greatest chip of all time. They’re so good! They’re like a mix between a Frito and a Cool Ranch Dorito. I just can’t help myself.

What is your go-to hostess gift?

Usually just a bottle of wine. But these days if I’m feeling super prepared I’ll make a loaf cake. I’ll make a tea cake or a loaf cake over any other kind of cake any day. I don’t love spending a lot of time baking, and loaf cakes are usually just dump and stir. They’re more delicious than they should be given how little effort you have to put into them. I’ve just developed so many recipes for delicious loaf cakes that are kind of in my back pocket. I have an Earl Grey yogurt cake that’s really nice. In my book I just published two recipes for loaf cakes—one is for a brown butter and labneh banana bread, and another one is for a grapefruit and olive oil cake, and they’re both stunning looking but very easy to execute.

What is the dish you cooked most often during the pandemic?

It’s cliché, but beans! At least at the beginning. I’ve always been a bean lover, and I’ve always made beans from scratch, but they were on repeat in the beginning. And I also got kind of into making my own tortillas.

What tool gets used the most in your kitchen?

The microplane is the tool that I use all the time, and it’s the tool that you’ll encounter a lot in this book, because I cook with a lot of lemon zest and I cook with a lot of grated garlic, and that’s the perfect tool for those things.


Easy Salty Popcorn | How to Make Homemade Popcorn in a Saucepan

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Another key way that Frank's popcorn technique diverges from the norm is that it asks you to pour off the popped popcorn once it reaches the top of the stock pot. This, again, helps with that chamber effect and makes sure that the still un-popped kernels are exposed to a lot of air (which helps them pop and keeps them crispy).

To pour off the popcorn, you'll need to keep a large mixing bowl handy. In case I haven't already made it clear, I like to make a massive amount of popcorn, so I opt for the extra large bowl from the winners of our mixing bowl product test—the bowls come in a set, which will come in handy for baking projects in the kitchen, and also for when you make too much popcorn for one bowl (something that has happened to me more than once). These also come with lids, which are handy for storing leftover popcorn.


Spicy caramel popcorn is a good fit for that socially distant get-together

Slowly, cautiously, we are emerging from our quarantine. It’s still scary out there, but we social animals wither without time spent with friends and family. I’ve learned in these past few weeks that I’m less of an introvert than I had assumed. I’ve been craving face-to-face time. I’m not ready for people to come inside, but I’m lucky enough to have a backyard and patio where I can entertain another couple, safely socially distanced.

We’ve had friends over twice. Each time, the two of us and the two of them sat around our table. Our two chairs were six feet from their two chairs. I may have overthought how and what to serve, but this is my jam: For years, I’ve been writing about bringing and serving food to friends.

A few months ago, I would have decorated a charcuterie and cheese board and placed it between us. We would reach over and snag a piece of sopressata and spear an olive, reach into a pile of crackers and use a communal knife to spread that runny Camembert. I would have chilled a couple bottles of wine, placed an ice bucket and cocktail fixings on a side table lined with glasses. People would help themselves. But now? The thought of so many hands near the food makes me uncomfortable. My entire go-to plan for casual cocktail hour needed rethinking.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

For my first foray back into entertaining, I wanted a singular, stellar snack, and this irresistible spicy sweet popcorn fit the bill. I use a good smoky bacon and cut it into small pieces to distribute through the popped corn. Adding a little bacon fat is decadent and delicious, as is topping the caramel with bourbon. You can make this popcorn with neither the bacon nor the bourbon, but do add back the smoky flavor with smoked paprika or Mushroom Bacon.

I love gochujang (or the ground spice gochugaru) as the central character in Korean fried chicken and bo ssam. But lately I’ve been sneaking it into more foods. Where I might have reached for crushed red pepper before, now I am more likely to choose gochujang for its sweet, acidic, complex heat. It’s unlike anything else, and once it’s in your refrigerator, don’t be shy. Try it in pasta sauces and grain bowls. Stir it in with abandon. That’s what I do with the caramel for this popcorn snack.

First, make sure you don’t under- or overcook (burn) the caramel. It can be fussy, and a thermometer will help. Don’t walk away instead, hover and stir. When it’s dark and smells buttery and toasty, it’s done. Pour it over the popcorn, bacon and peanuts. Don’t look for all the popcorn to be coated like Cracker Jack. Some won’t look coated at all, but that will get sorted in the oven. The trick with caramel and popcorn is to use just enough to coat but not so much so that it gets soggy.

Popcorn can go high or low. I’ve been offered truffle popcorn at the Inn at Little Washington, served in small striped bags. And had the best and the worst popcorn at the movie theater, depending on when it was made. Ever tried sprinkling popped corn with nutritional yeast or cinnamon sugar? However it’s spiced, it lends itself to clever individual-portion packaging for your cocktail hour. Sure, put it in bowls, but how about small brown paper lunch bags that your kids have decorated? Maybe you have gift bags or tins left over from your holiday cookie swap. It looks as tantalizing and delicious in wide-mouth Mason jars as in red Solo cups with each guest’s name written on the side.

On the patio, six feet apart and across our table, I set up two sets of chairs with small tables between. On each table were two cocktail glasses with garnishes, a stack of cocktail napkins, two water glasses and a jar of ice water. Earlier in the day, I had funneled a batch of martinis into individual swing-top bottles, storing them in the freezer. I filled four wide-mouth, quart-size Mason jars with popcorn. We set up the tables, sat down and waited for our friends to walk through the back gate. It felt good to share the space. To talk without an Internet delay. To laugh and to enjoy silence. To look at the stars. We all felt renewed.


How to Make the Most Amazing Popcorn at Home

This stove-top popcorn recipe is a regular snack in our house. It’s quick to make, healthy-ish and most importantly it’s the tastiest popcorn in the world. For me, the best popcorn consists of only two added ingredients – butter and salt. It’s the technique involved that makes this delicious. Here’s a few key tips on how to make better popcorn than the boring microwave stuff.

Why Should I Make Stovetop Popcorn?

I prefer to make my own popcorn because it tastes better than microwave popcorn, is much healthier and pretty quick to make. I even prefer it to the movie-theater popcorn (although movie theater popcorn has a special place in my heart!).

How to Prevent Chewy Popcorn

The first crucial tip for delicious popped kernels is steam control. When the kernels pop they release steam which ruins the crispiness of the kernels. If you’ve ever tried to make popcorn with a tight fitting lid then you may have noticed that it becomes chewy and unpleasant to eat. This is because the steam gets trapped in the pot and makes the popcorn soggy.

Solving this problem is easy. Use a pot with small holes in the lid (colander lid) which allows the steam to escape but keeps the kernels from bouncing everywhere. This pot we had lying around in our kitchen from Ikea is actually the perfect stovetop popcorn maker. And it’s under €20.

I Can’t Find the Colander Lid!

If you can’t find the exact same pot don’t worry. Try to find a big stockpot with a heavy bottom that has a colander lid. If it’s difficult to find that colander lid then you have two options:

  1. You can slightly tip the normal lid open while cooking to let out some of the steam. (Be careful to not let out exploding popcorn kernels!)
  2. Or you can cover the lid tightly with tin foil and poke little holes to allow the steam to escape.

Essential Tips

Here’s a few essential tips to make sure you have the tastiest homemade popcorn:

  • Add 2 kernels to the pan with oil and heat. Wait for it to pop, then you know exactly when the oil is at the perfect popcorn popping temperature.
  • Swirl the kernels in the pot while they cook to prevent them from burning.
  • Start with high heat and then turn down to medium heat once the kernels start popping – this will also cook them more evenly.
  • Once the popcorn has 2-3 seconds in between pops, turn off the heat and immediately open the lid to let off all that steam.
  • Add the butter and salt right away so the salt sticks.

Is Homemade Popcorn a Healthy Snack

Yes it can be because you can control how much butter and salt to use unlike pre-packaged microwave popcorn. Plain popped corn contains dietary fiber and is low in calories. You can add less salt or less butter depending on what diet is recommended for you.

Is Popcorn Keto?

Yes, but only in small amounts

A 3 cup (24g) serving equates to about 18 grams of carbs — or 14 grams of net carbs which can be incorporated into a 50g carb Keto diet.

*Update – Although some people on the keto diet can handle a small amount of popcorn, not everyone can. Popcorn is more of a grey area for anyone on the keto diet and it’s always best to check with your doctor for what’s best for you.

Possible Additions

Although I’m a butter and salt kinda guy you can get pretty wild with the flavours if you want. Here are few suggestions:


Every mouthful an explosion of flavors with this spicy, bourbon-laced caramel popcorn

Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post

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Popcorn can go high or low. I've been offered truffle popcorn at the Inn at Little Washington, served in small striped bags. And had the best and the worst popcorn at the movie theater, depending on when it was made. Ever tried sprinkling popped corn with nutritional yeast or cinnamon sugar? However it's spiced, it lends itself to clever individual-portion packaging for your cocktail hour.

Sure, put it in bowls, but how about small brown paper lunch bags that your kids have decorated? Maybe you have gift bags or tins left over from your holiday cookie swap. It looks as tantalizing and delicious in wide-mouth Mason jars as in red Solo cups with each guest's name written on the side.

On the patio, six feet apart and across our table, I set up two sets of chairs with small tables between. On each table were two cocktail glasses with garnishes, a stack of cocktail napkins, two water glasses and a jar of ice water. Earlier in the day, I had funneled a batch of martinis into individual swing-top bottles, storing them in the freezer. I filled four wide-mouth, quart-size Mason jars with popcorn. We set up the tables, sat down and waited for our friends to walk through the back gate.

It felt good to share the space. To talk without an Internet delay. To laugh and to enjoy silence. To look at the stars. We all felt renewed.

Every mouthful explodes with the sweetness of bourbon-laced caramel, the heat of gochujang, the salty smoke of crisp vegan bacon and the snap of freshly popped corn.

Notes: The caramel coating here will be more sparse than the commercially available caramel popcorn versions. Some won't look coated at all, but that will get sorted in the oven.

Gochujang, a spicy Korean chile paste with fruity overtones, can be found in the international aisle of many grocery stores, at Asian markets or online.

6 slices (3 ounces/85 grams) thick-cut smoked vegan bacon

1/3 cup (about 2 2/3 ounces/78 milliliters) vegetable, canola or another neutral oil

1 cup (8 ounces/226 grams) popcorn kernels

2 cups (8 ounces/226 grams) roasted, salted peanuts

12 tablespoons (6 ounces/170 grams) unsalted butter

1 cup (7 ounces/200 grams) lightly packed light brown sugar

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

2 tablespoons (1 ounce/30 milliliters) bourbon (optional)

1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon gochujang paste or gochugaru chili powder (or piment d'Espelette, Aleppo pepper or cayenne pepper), to taste

Have your largest bowl (at least 8 quarts) available. Position a rack in the middle of the oven if two large, rimmed baking sheets can fit side by side. If not, place the racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 400 degrees.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and spread out the bacon in a single layer. Cook the bacon 10 to 12 minutes, or until crisp. Transfer the baking sheet to a wire rack and reduce the oven temperature to 250 degrees. Once the bacon is cool, chop into small pieces and set aside reserve the rendered bacon fat on the baking sheet.

In a 5-quart pot over medium-high heat, add the oil and 3 popcorn kernels. Cover the pot and when the kernels pop, add the remaining popcorn. Remove the pot from the heat, cover and wait exactly 30 seconds.

Place the pot back on the heat, cover, and agitate the pan, shaking and shaking until the corn stops popping. Pour the popcorn into the bowl, then add the peanuts, bacon and about 1 tablespoon reserved bacon fat. Stir to combine.

Line two large, rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.

In a 3-quart saucepan with tall sides over medium heat, cook the butter, sugar and salt until boiling, increasing the heat slowly to medium-high or high, stirring continually and adjusting the heat so the caramel does not burn. It should take 10 to 12 minutes for the caramel to become dark amber. If you have a candy thermometer, the caramel should reach 265 degrees. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the baking soda. The caramel will bubble up stir it down, add the bourbon, if using, and chile paste, and stir until smooth.

Place a slightly damp folded towel under the bowl to keep it from wiggling around. Holding the pan a little above the bowl of popcorn, peanuts and bacon, very slowly pour the caramel over the popcorn, pausing to stir as you pour. Use two long-handled wooden or silicone spoons to coat everything in caramel.

Divide the popcorn between the lined baking sheets and spread out the mixture without crowding. Do not use on a single pan. Transfer the sheets to the oven and bake for about 1 hour, until the caramel is no longer sticky. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely, then break up any especially large chunks before serving.

Calories: 395 Total Fat: 29 g Saturated Fat: 10 g Cholesterol: 36 mg Sodium: 457 mg Carbohydrates: 23 g Dietary Fiber: 4 g Sugars: 6 g Protein: 9 g.


What are corn nuts?

Corn nuts have a similar taste to Fritos, and go figure, Fritos are made with corn! Corn nuts or quicos are made from a variety of Peruvian corn that has big kernels. More like giant kernels. They are first soaked in water for a few days, to plump up before they are fried until hard and crunchy. The texture is totally crunchy and it’s kind of fun crunching on a giant corn kernel.

Tossed with chile flakes and nutritional yeast, these quicos or corn nuts, were pronounced a success by Manservant who would not let me throw the last three away. He even suggested I save the last of the seasoning mixture to toss with popcorn, which isn’t a bad idea.

It only takes three ingredients, minus the chile flakes to make these crunchy nuggets. I buy my corn nuts at Sprouts or Trader Joe’s but I think they are found most everywhere. Another key component is nutritional yeast which gives flavor and more texture to the corn nuts.

Have you ever used nutritional yeast before? Nutritional yeast is made with the same type of yeast that is used to make bread, however the yeast cells are killed so it can be used as a food product. Tasting kind of cheesy and savory, it is full of umami flavor.

Nutritional yeast is a complete protein which makes it perfect for vegans and has 2 g of protein in each tablespoon. Loaded with B vitamins, it is a great way to add antioxidants to your diet.

Found in the spice aisle of the grocery, nutritional yeast can be sprinkled in soup, over popcorn, and I have even used it for flavoring potato chips. It keeps well and can even be added to dog food. I have to try that!

I don’t know about you, and even though it’s only Monday, I ‘m already planning for the weekend. These chile corn nuts would be a great way to start!


Kosher Salt

In the Frank method, every time you pour off a layer of popped corn, you salt it. This ensures that the salt will be evenly distributed throughout, instead of just sitting on top of the big popcorn heap. But while you may thinkg this is the time for your fancy flaky salt, it&aposs not. You want small salt kernels that will dissolve into the popcorn, penetrating it with flavor. Larger kernels will just sink to the bottom of the bowl. (Also, why are you trying to make popcorn fancy? Relax!)

BUY IT: Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt, 3 pounds, $11 on Amazon


Watch the video: Ρουμελιώτικη τυρόπιτα - Προβλιόρα. Foodouki (August 2022).