Latest recipes

The Life-Changing Bowl of Ramen

The Life-Changing Bowl of Ramen


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Photo by Gabby Phi

Forget all that you think you know about ramen. Here’s the truth: Ramen isn’t just those wavy noodles stuffed in a Styrofoam cup that you can buy for thirty cents at the nearest convenience store. Real ramen, and especially this ramen, will blow your f****** mind, put it back together and then blow it again.

One Austin restaurant that serves this deliciousness is Ramen Tatsu-ya. Located right off of Research Boulevard in a strip of Asian restaurants, Ramen Tatsu-Ya has a constant line of customers wrapped around the building. Yes, the line may seem rather impossible and never ending, and watching the people slurping their soup from inside may be one of the most painful things ever, but the wait only makes it that much better. Once you are finally allowed to step inside, the first whiff alone will let you know you’re about to eat some damn good ramen.

Photo by Gabby Phi

When we finally got our noodle-y goodness, the “Tonkotsu Original”, we dove right into our steaming bowls. Filled with pork broth, one soft boiled egg poached in soy sauce, woodear mushrooms, pork belly, green onions and corn I added myself, this bowl was life-changing. The pork broth was incredible and slightly creamy– which was different– but so good. The noodles were perfectly cooked and I inhaled each spoonful like there was no tomorrow. I felt like a ravenous child who didn’t know how to eat properly because all my common food-eating mannerisms disappeared during my hustle to keep the goodness going.

The pork belly was delicately spiraled and so tender that I tore off bites using my chopsticks. And that soft-boiled egg… dayum. Poaching it in soy sauce made it perfectly salty, and yet the yolk was slightly sweet which made it even better. The corn bomb, which is a definite must, added another element of richness to the broth since the corn was held together by butter, as it should be. The woodear mushrooms were a great touch and went along with the other components of the ramen perfectly.

Photo by Gabby Phi

Before I knew it, my noodles were gone and all that was left to do was polish off the broth, which I did gladly. I don’t know if I have ever eaten so fast in my life. After we left I realized that the entire front half of my body was covered in broth splatters from trying to pull the noodles out and slurping them up. I couldn’t help myself. This ramen is something everyone needs to go experience and go crazy over.

Location: 8557 Research Boulevard #126, Austin TX 78758
Hours of Operation: Tuesday-Friday: 11:00am-2:00pm, 5:00pm-10pm; Saturday- Sunday: 12:00pm-3:00pm, 5:00pm-10:00pm

The post The Life-Changing Bowl of Ramen appeared first on Spoon University.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.


Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls

These easy homemade Ramen bowls let you enjoy a big slurp-worthy bowl of Ramen in the comfort of your own home! With approachable ingredients, anyone can make this.

The Ramen bowl is a true masterpiece.

This easy and approachable homemade Ramen bowl recipe is five years old and it remains the most popular recipe on this blog going through the comment section makes me happy. The purpose of sharing this recipe was simple: I wanted soup lovers to be able to enjoy a big comforting bowl of Ramen—similar to those you find at Ramen bars—in the comfort of their own homes. Because not everyone lives near good Japanese food, and sometimes you just don’t want to leave the damn house. Both fantastic reasons to have easy access to delicious Ramen. Knowing I’ve been able to fill up all of these bellies with warmth and happiness is satisfying.

Different styles of Ramen.

If you’ve ever had the privilege of slurping up real-deal Ramen, then you’ve been exposed to the various types. The menus are always full of options and the differences in tastes and broth-textures are notable. Here are some of the most popular types:

Shoyu

This is the most common style of Ramen. Shoyu is the Japanese word for soy sauce, and that’s exactly what’s simmered into the base of this broth. The result is a light-bodied broth that is brown and clear, unlike the more milky and opaque tonkatsu broth. Intrigued? Check out my recipe for Spicy Shoyu Ramen.

Shio

Another light broth—in both body and flavor—is shio, which means salt. This simple broth is golden in color and is made up of chicken or fish bones.

Miso

If you’ve had miso soup, then you’re familiar with this cloudy and complex broth. Made with fermented soy bean paste, miso can be white or red in color. The broth is packed with umami and feels thicker on the palate than the lighter broths used for shio or shoyu broths. If this sounds good to you, check out my Miso Ramen.

Tonkatsu

Full-bodied, fatty, and satisfying, the tonkatsu broth is the richest of them all. It’s made up of simmered pork bones which break down during the cooking process and release collagen, which makes a broth so thick it’ll coat the back of your spoon! The broth is often fortified with pork or chicken fat. So if you’re ordering yourself some Tonkatsu Ramen from a menu, know that you’re in for an indulgent treat.

What noodles should I use for homemade Ramen bowls?

The point of this recipe is convenience, so it calls for easy instant Ramen noodles from those cheap-o packages we relied on in college. If you live near an East Asian market, you’ll likely find a variety of fresh Ramen. Those are great! Buckwheat soba noodles are an option, but they will bring a different flavor to the soup with their wheatiness.

Ramen toppings.

One of the most noticeable things about a big bowl of Ramen is, of course, all of those tasty goodies piled on top. Here’s a list of toppings typically used in Ramen bowls:

  • Soft-boiled egg with a jammy yolk
  • Narutomaki (fish cakes you’ve likely seen them. They’re the thinly-sliced rounds with pink spirals in the middle)
  • Enoki mushrooms
  • Nori (dried seaweed)
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Bean sprouts
  • Corn kernels
  • Scallions

How to make these Easy Homemade Ramen Bowls.

As you can see, when it comes to at-home Ramen, you’ve got options. I kept this recipe approachable. It’s great as is, and if you feel like getting creative, use this recipe as a base!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Instant Ramen (discard the flavor packets)
  • Sesame oil
  • Olive oil (or avocado oil)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Shredded carrots
  • Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
  • Chicken or vegetable broth
  • Rice vinegar
  • Low sodium soy sauce
  • Sriracha or hot chili garlic sauce, like Sambal Oelek
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Soft-boiled egg

Here’s what you’ll do:

More soups you’ll want to slurp:

Hope you enjoy!

If you plan on making this recipe, be sure to snap a pic and tag us on Insta! @killing__thyme.



Comments:

  1. Cacey

    You commit an error. I can prove it. Write to me in PM.

  2. Bradley

    Agree, very useful idea

  3. Derwent

    Completely I share your opinion. In it something is also idea good, agree with you.

  4. Parthenios

    The author is well done, that's just one thing I did not understand how much is it?

  5. Viraj

    I apologize for interrupting you.

  6. Kaeden

    You are not right. I'm sure. I propose to discuss it. Email me at PM, we'll talk.

  7. Rahul

    I confirm. I subscribe to all of the above. We can communicate on this theme.



Write a message