Latest recipes

Marcus Samuelsson Comes to the Islands; Will Open Restaurant in Bermuda

Marcus Samuelsson Comes to the Islands; Will Open Restaurant in Bermuda


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

‘Marcus’ will open on May 27 at the Hamilton Princess and Beach Club in Bermuda

The king of urban Southern comfort food comes to the Caribbean.

Marcus Samuelsson is on fire. Just last week the New York City chef opened Streetbird, a rotisserie chicken-focused restaurant in Harlem, and now he’s bringing his cooking expertise to a more tropical island than Manhattan. Samuelsson’s new restaurant, Marcus, will open in Bermuda at the Hamilton Princess and Beach Club on May 27.

The menu will be decidedly different than that of his well-known flagship, Red Rooster, in Harlem, with a globally focused cuisine rooted in Caribbean and Portuguese food culture. Think menu highlights like oysters with black rum mignonette, tandoori smoked salmon, jerk pork belly, and fish chowder croquettes, all made with locally sourced ingredients from the island.

"Marcus will be a game-changer for the island," said Allan Federer, general manager of Hamilton Princess and Beach Club. "We are thrilled to partner with such a highly esteemed and talented chef, and look forward to showcasing the dramatic new restaurant to our guests and local visitors."

The restaurant itself will be spacious and decorated with modern artwork, with accents that derive from Caribbean culture, like decorative sails. Plus, if you book one of the dine and stay packages at the hotel, you’ll get a signed copy of the chef’s new book, Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook At Home.


It was the Hamilton that drew me in. Everyone knows the hotel is part of the island’s history, and we instantly loved the Bermudan touches on the property. My restau- rant, Marcus’, is decorated with world-class art by Andy Warhol and Liu Ye, but also has such local nautical flourishes as historic anchors and ship paneling.

We want Bermudans to feel like this is their restaurant, and we want the food to taste like Bermuda. We work with fishermen to bring seafood straight from the Atlantic and with island farms to source ingredients such as honey and wild rosemary.


Chef Samuelsson To Host Dinner On Wednesday

Hamilton Princess & Beach Club today [March 13] announces that Chef Marcus Samuelsson will be hosting a dinner on Wednesday, March 15 to promote his new cookbook.

The celebrity chef will be cooking some of his favourite dishes from his latest cook book ‘The Red Rooster Cookbook: The Story of Food and Hustle in Harlem’ at Marcus’ before taking the time to meet and greet fans.

Marcus Samuelsson said: “I’m looking forward to visiting Bermuda and cooking the food I love for old and new friends. Everything on the menu is featured in my latest cookbook. I want to show people that eating is about so much more than what is on your plate. I love to create a vibrant dining experience where everyone is having a good time.”

His latest cookbook looks beyond food and celebrates the neighbourhood. It has playlists for chapters and features stories of the Harlem community alongside the recipes.

Allan Federer, General Manager at Hamilton Princess & Beach Club, said: “We are very much looking forward to welcoming Marcus back to Bermuda and we know guests won’t be disappointed when he cooks with the recipes hand-picked from his new cook book.”

Welcome cocktails at Marcus’ dinner will include Yes Chef, The Brownstoner, The Savoy and the Dark and Stormier.

Hors ‘oeurvres of Charred Char Arepas, La Marqueta Pork Tack Tack with Jerk Bacon and Devil Eggs With Chicken Skin Mayo will be served.

The set menu will be Squash Salad with Crunch Quinoa, Coconut Ceviche, Obama Short Rib with Mac and Greens and Fried Brussel Sprouts With Bacon Dip, followed by Rum Cake.

Cocktails are at 7pm, with the four-course dinner starting at 8pm. Tickets cost $85 plus gratuities per person – they are limited and available on a first come, first served basis. They are available to buy at www.ptix.bm

Marcus’ re-opened its doors on March 9 with a fresh new look and menu. The popular restaurant underwent a refresh in February to remove the wall behind the bar and open up the restaurant’s already spectacular views even more.

For more information on Marcus’ visit the website here or find out more @Marcuscooks or #RedRoosterCookbook on social media.

The restaurant is open for lunch from 12pm to 3pm, dinner from 6pm to 10pm and late-night dining from 10pm to 12am. Champagne brunch is served on Sundays from 12pm to 3pm.


Guide to Bermuda’s international cuisine

Bermuda might be a small, isolated island, but the restaurant offering is as vast as can be imagined, with a wide range of international cuisine from far-flung corners of the globe.

Marcus’, Hamilton Princess & Beach Club

Visitors to Bermuda benefit from the skills of the island’s world-class chefs who have trained at top culinary schools, bringing their considerable restaurant experience to Bermuda to the delight of diners.

Restaurants with menus specializing in dishes from England, Africa, Asia, Latin America, and more invite you to sample global cuisines. All tastes and budgets are catered to here, whether you’re looking for a top-notch fine dining experience or a casual meal in a relaxed setting. Bermuda offers dining establishments for every occasion from business to pleasure to romance to celebration. The island’s high-end restaurants offer an unmatched air of sophistication, while modest venues serve up generous portions at prices that won’t break the bank.

Across the board, Bermuda’s unique local ingredients add a special freshness and distinctiveness to restaurant menus. As you’d expect from an island in the middle of the ocean, the seafood in Bermuda is exceptional. A number of seafood specialities are available throughout the year including wahoo, tuna, rockfish, red snapper and mussels, as well as local lobster which is available from September through to March.

We’ve rounded up some of our favorite international restaurants that are guaranteed to please…

Marcus’, Hamilton Princess & Beach Club

Marcus Samuelsson’s signature restaurant at the Hamilton Princess & Beach Club, Marcus’, has a diverse, exciting menu that features his signature style of globally-influenced cuisine, while highlighting Bermuda’s fresh local ingredients and rich Caribbean, British, and Portuguese heritage.

Located in the Hamilton Princess & Beach Club, Marcus’ offers panoramic views of beautiful Hamilton Harbor from the nearly 360-degrees of windows and terraces. In addition, an open kitchen and central bar create a very inviting environment. Works by Andy Warhol, Liu Ye, and Nelson Mandela, among others, decorate the walls.

Marcus’ menu features dishes like the Obama’s Short Rib for Two, Aleppo Honey-Glazed Salmon, Deviled Rooster Eggs, and the very popular Lenox Smash Burger. Additional dishes pay tribute to Bermudian culture like the Fish Chowder Bites. Marcus’ offers live entertainment on Tuesdays with Latin nights and on Thursdays with reggae nights. It’s not unusual to find visiting artists from overseas at the restaurant. A small late-night menu is available for night owls.

Visit: Hamilton Princess & Beach Club, 76 Pitts Bay Road, Hamilton

Book: 441-295-3000 / 441-298-2028 | www.thehamiltonprincess.com

Beau Rivage Restaurant

Beau Rivage at the Newstead Belmont Hills Golf Resort & Spa offers authentic French cuisine in a beautiful Bermuda setting. An extensive, award-winning collection of international wines complements the selection of lunch and dinner dishes, which beautifully meld intriguing flavors with the best local ingredients Bermuda has to offer. Start your meal with the perfectly crispy yet tender calamari frits, and for a true taste of the island, the rockfish fillet is a divine main course. Finish off your evening with the classic French dessert crème brûlée—there’s a different flavor each day.

Visit: 27 Harbor Road, Paget

Book: 441-232-8686

Bolero Brasserie

Tucked into a narrow alleyway in Hamilton, this bistro has a sense of secrecy, where those “in the know” come to gather over favorites like pork cheek and snail saute, squid ink linguine, or chickpea croquettes. But it’s safe to say that the word is out about this neighborhood eatery, which has been a lively, bustling, friendly hub for a decade now. Since its opening in 2007, Bolero Brasserie has earned several Best of Bermuda and TripAdvisor awards, and has been featured in numerous local publications.

Executives clad in business suits dine next to locals in casual attire at Bolero Brasserie, whose good food and friendly, efficient service attract customers from all walks of life. The dishes at this warm and charming venue reflect typical brasserie fare with an extensive menu that changes frequently throughout the year with the exception of Bolero classics, loved by regulars and first-time visitors alike.

Visit: 95 Front Street, Hamilton

Discover a unique atmosphere of old English charm at Henry VIII. A true favorite of locals and tourists alike, Henry’s has been one of Bermuda’s premier restaurants for more than 40 years. As you enjoy breathtaking views of Bermuda’s South Shore, Henry’s vast menu of sumptuous delights tantalizes your taste buds. The executive chef has created an extensive menu using the freshest and best quality ingredients like Certified Angus Beef. Menu selections vary from traditional English and European cuisine to seafood and Bermuda’s freshly caught local fish. Their famous Bermuda fish chowder is not to be missed. If sushi is your choice, sample the many wonderful dishes created by Henry’s talented sushi chefs. Henry’s outdoor terrace is a beautiful setting for savoring a meal while enjoying the spectacular scenery. Unwind with Henry’s daily happy hour in their Oak Room Pub or come later in the evening for dancing to top-notch entertainment. On Sundays, Bermuda’s best Sunday brunch is served at Henry’s and it is an incredible value.

Visit: 69 South Road, Southampton

Book: 441-238-1977 | www.henrys.bm

House of India

For more than two decades, this quintessential Indian restaurant has been recognized for its commitment to traditional Indian cuisine with an enduring emphasis on culture and service. House of India chefs take immense pride in their ingredients, using only the finest spices, roasted in-house, and even preparing their own blend of garam masala. Everything is cooked fresh and all sauces are made from scratch. First-time customers quickly become repeat guests, whether local or visitor, when they taste House of India’s prized chicken tikka masala cooked in a creamy cashew tomato-based sauce. The restaurant also specializes in mouthwatering tandoor charcoal-style cooking, where marinated chicken and fish or shrimp kebabs are prepared to perfection. The lamb chops are simply sumptuous.

House of India’s chefs will accommodate all special dietary needs choose from more than 50 aromatic curries in various styles and heat profiles from all regions of India. Accompany these with amazing breads or family garlic naan washed down with ice cold Indian Kingfisher beer, a cocktail, or a selection from their varied wine list. This warm cozy restaurant showcases Indian decor of bright silks and traditional artwork, resulting in a vibrant atmosphere that’s the perfect complement to the rich aromas that excite your senses and tantalize your taste buds.


Marcus Restaurant To Open At Hamilton Princess

The Hamilton Princess today announced that their new signature restaurant to be managed by acclaimed chef Marcus Samuelsson will be named Marcus’.

Marcus’ is set to open at the hotel on May 27 and will include some dishes that were featured in last summer’s pop-up restaurant, Samuelsson at HP.

Marcus’ will offer a vibrant menu hand crafted by Chef Samuelsson to include his signature globally-influenced cuisine, while highlighting local ingredients and flavors. The menu will be executed by Executive Chef Leo Marino, from Samuelsson at HP and Samuelsson’s acclaimed Red Rooster Harlem in New York City.

“I am excited to launch Marcus’ at The Hamilton Princess. Last summer’s pop-up restaurant was well received among both locals and tourists,” says Marcus Samuelsson. “The Island is an inspiring place to open a restaurant.

“The fresh, local seafood, quality ingredients and deep-rooted Bermudian culinary traditions all come together naturally to create a rich dining experience. To top it off, the views of the harbour from the new restaurant are spectacular.”

“All Marcus Samuelsson Group restaurants strive to maintain a local authenticity within the community,” explains Nils Noren, vice president of restaurant operations at the Marcus Samuelsson Group.

“When we opened Samuelsson at HP last summer, our culinary staff included students from Bermuda College. The local staff contributed a great deal to the success of the pop up restaurant and we look forward to working with local talent again at Marcus’.”


Addis Tacos

It's been thrilling opening Red Rooster Shoreditch, as well as the adjacent Tienda Roosteria inside The Curtain hotel. Tienda Roosteria offers a mix of traditional and non-traditional dishes inspired by Mexico, with tacos being a staple alongside innovative cocktails that champion sustainability by using ingredients from other operations in the hotel.

Now open for dinner, walk-ins are welcome and reservations can be made here. If you can’t come in in person, you can make your own Addis Tacos at home with my recipe that incorporates Mexican, Ethiopian and Southern influences all in one tasty taco.

Don’t forget to follow the new Red Rooster Shoreditch on social @RedRooster_LDN

INGREDIENTS

5 # chicken, ground
12 oz. garlic
24 oz. red onion
6 oz. ginger
2 oz. tomato paste
2 oz. Berbere
4 oz. butter
24 oz. chicken stock
25 oz. red wine
Salt

3.5 oz. yellow mustard seed
8 oz. garlic, minced
1 # Berbere, blended smooth
1 oz. Cayenne
16 oz. Canola Oil

DIRECTIONS

Doro Wat

Method:
Robot coupe onion, garlic, ginger. In a medium saucepan sauté the vegetables in butter until softened in butter until dry (about 20 min). Add tomato paste and berbere cook until fragrant (about 10 min). Add in chicken, stock, red wine and salt. Braise over low heat for 2 hours. Check seasoning

Awaze

Method:
Toast yellow mustard seeds until fragrant. In a spice grinder or with a mortar and pestle, blend mustard seeds until smooth, set aside. Blend berbere until smooth, set aside. Blend together garlic and oil. Add all ingredients to bowl and mix until smooth Season with salt.

To Assemble:
1 pc tortilla on plancha
2/3 cup doro wat
1/4 cup collard greens
1 tablespoon cottage cheese
2 slices of hard-boiled egg
1/2 - 1 teaspoon berbere
2 tablespoons awaze on side

Grill the tortilla on a plancha or in a skillet until pliable and lightly charred. Spoon the doro wat in the center of the taco and top with the collard greens, cottage cheese, hard boiled egg, and a sprinkling of berbere. Serve with a small cup of awaze on the side for dipping.


Chef Marcus Samuelsson

Show me a restaurant menu, and I’ll show you a window into a chef’s soul. Okay, soul might be pushing it, but you’ll certainly find dishes that point to his or her roots, childhood, cooking background, and recent influences and surroundings. Star chef Marcus Samuelsson is a perfect example of that. When you scan the menu of the newest restaurant he presides over, Marcus’ Bermuda at the Hamilton Princess & Beach Club (a Fairmont managed hotel in, yes, Bermuda), you’ll see fried chicken and waffles, jerk pork belly, and grilled conch tostadas. Take a look at the menu at the acclaimed New York restaurant he owns, Red Rooster Harlem, and there’s mac and greens, blackened catfish, Harlem chowder, and a dish no one could resist called shrimp, hog, and grits. (Look no further than downstairs to find another Samuelsson establishment, Ginny’s Supper Club). At his most casual restaurant, Streetbird Rotisserie, also in Harlem, the menu is more or less devoted to chicken, be it—again—fried, rotisserie roasted, or starring in a bowl of ramen. It’s hard to imagine all this comfort food comes from a chef who made his name two decades ago making sophisticated Scandinavian food, and in doing so became the youngest chef to be awarded a coveted three-star review in The New York Times.

Today, at 46, Samuelsson is cooking very differently. His style combines international influences with traditional cuisines from Sweden, as well as Africa, Japan, and most recently the neighbourhood he now calls home, Harlem. Born in Ethiopia, the New York–based chef was raised in Sweden and moved to the United States in 1994. “I moved to America based on diversity,” says Samuelsson, “and New York City at the time was the place for me.”

The Manhattan restaurant that rocketed the young chef to fame was called Aquavit, and the cuisine was (and remains) distinctly Scandinavian. And this was back when Scandinavian cuisine had yet to break out into world domination mode thanks to chefs like René Redzepi of Noma or Magnus Nilsson of Fäviken.

From there, Samuelsson’s cooking took another turn when he served Asian-fusion cuisine at Riingo (since closed). The six cookbooks he has authored range from Aquavit: And the New Scandinavian Cuisine (Houghton Mifflin, 2003) and The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Foods and Flavors of Africa (Wiley, 2006) to New American Table (Wiley, 2009), where he explores the regional cuisines of the U.S., to his memoir, Yes, Chef (Random House, 2012). And if you’re thinking you’ve seen him on TV, you would be correct. Samuelsson has appeared on talk shows ranging from Today to Charlie Rose, and has proved a fierce competitor on Food Network reality programs like Iron Chef and Top Chef Masters, where in 2009 he beat out chefs like Susur Lee and Rick Moonen to nab first place.

But the Marcus Samuelsson of today seems quite different from the 20-something being showered with critic’s stars, or the 30-something competing to become a star himself. For one thing, his food is now quite casual. “I’m thinking about what I’m feeling at the moment,” says the chef in an interview between the lunch and dinner service at Red Rooster Harlem. “And right now that’s casual, and comfort, and elegance. I like a restaurant where you can eat at the bar. It’s a more democratic way of cooking. I take pride in my cooking not for the 1 per cent, but for people who are looking for good food with good value. I love fine dining, but I love all kinds of dining. And I like it to be elegant and social—and delicious.”

Peering down at a whole fried chicken at Marcus’ Bermuda, I’m seduced not only by the golden beauty of the bird and the gorgeous smell wafting up from the succulent flesh beneath its bubbly carapace, but the presentation as well. The bird is first placed on the table whole for all to admire, and then swept away and returned expertly carved alongside grits, collard greens, hot sauce, and a ramekin of whipped chicken-liver butter. The dish may be composed of simple Southern fare, and yet in the hands of this chef, a humble chicken is given star treatment worthy of a grande table in Europe.

Samuelsson’s menu in Bermuda lists signature dishes like that showstopper of a fire pit–roasted jerk chicken and blackened fish with grits (often made with the meaty regional fish, wahoo), yet there are local ingredients and dishes on offer as well. “I work with local farmers and fishermen in Bermuda,” says Samuelsson. “We enjoy being local. It’s not me dictating the cooking so much as the island telling me what to cook. Right now I love these wonderful small lobsters they have.”

In the hands of this chef, a humble chicken is given star treatment worthy of a grande table in Europe.

For Samuelsson, there’s a certain amount of storytelling that goes into creating a menu. “I try to find the balance between local and my journey as a chef. Of course there will be always something local there, but also Ethiopian spices on my food.”

As for inspiration and ambition, the chef remains humble. “My community in Harlem is my inspiration right now. We are here, and we still have a long way to go. My focus is on creating jobs. In Harlem we have two restaurants and 75 per cent of my staff comes from the community. I feel we are a success because the community where I am now has embraced me. But I never take that for granted. You have to constantly measure where you’re at. You’re only as successful as your next dish.”

As for other people evaluating Samuelsson’s work, the chef’s experience comes to the fore. “These lists and stars and accolades will always be something chefs can aspire to. It’s great for team morale and it’s nice to have customers’ compliments. And there will always be interest. But as a chef, you have to find your merit too. Working on your business and your food is far more important,” he says. “At the end of the day, you have to operate your restaurant, focus on your product, control your take on a specific vision of a dish. You are the one driving your own bus, no matter what anyone else says.”

Further advice from Samuelsson for budding chefs includes opening your eyes to the world. “You really have to travel,” he says, citing his own trip to Japan as a young chef. “It was a game changer for me, as was working with a diverse series of chefs and being open to cooking with as many diverse ingredients and flavours as possible.”

Despite the plethora of international influences in his cooking, Samuelsson’s three mentors are American. First, Leah Chase, the New Orleans–based owner of Dooky Chase’s restaurant who is credited as being the grande dame of Creole cuisine. Then there is the late Charlie Trotter, the Chicago chef whose intricate tasting menus represented the most sophisticated cuisine, on a par with the world’s best. And, also, Daniel Boulud, the genial Frenchman whose international empire reaches from the formal restaurant Daniel to the more casual bistros, bars, and cafés under the Boulud moniker. Why those three chefs specifically? “Ms. Chase is a part of American history,” says Samuelsson, “and they all massively changed the landscape of dining in this country.”

He himself is contributing to change in America as well. Selected to cook the first state dinner for the Obama administration back in 2009 for the prime minister of India, Manmohan Singh, Samuelsson served a primarily vegetarian menu, emphasizing local and seasonal products including herbs and vegetables harvested from the White House garden.

When Samuelsson is not in the three restaurants he owns (or seven others he is chef at), on TV, or cooking for world leaders, he enjoys cooking at home for his friends and wife, model Maya Haile, as detailed in his latest book Marcus Off Duty (Houghton Mifflin, 2014). Samuelsson’s spare-time recipes range from Ethiopian to Swedish to Mexican, to Caribbean to Italian, to the best Southern soul food, resulting in dishes like coconut-lime curried chicken, mac and cheese and greens, and pumpkin tart with garam masala. He also contributes to FoodRepublic.com, a male-skewed website he co-founded and describes as “GQ online, but more about food.”

Simply put, cooking, for Samuelsson is a lifetime journey. “It’s my passion,” he says, “my life. I enjoy the young kids in the kitchen as much as my older mentors. And right now is a great time to be a chef.”


Treasured Islands: Anguilla, Bermuda, and St. Barths

West Indian glamour debuted a new address in February on the most sparkling of Anguilla’s 33 ultra-turquoise beaches, Shoal Bay East. Say hello to Zemi Beach House Resort & Spa, a collection of low-rise mansions designed by celebrated Caribbean architect Lane Pettigrew and cast over 6 acres and a near quarter-mile of beachfront. Sixty-three guest rooms seduce with a blend of dark and light woods, an earth-tone palette, and floor-to-ceiling windows that frame Anguilla’s 50 shades of blue. The vistas extend to the beachfront infinity-edge swimming pool and continue at the two seasonal-cuisine waterfront restaurants, which highlight authentic Anguillan flavors and feature local rum on tap.

Zemi Beach House Resort & Spa is Anguilla’s newest luxury property. Zemi’s oceanfront rooms feature a melange of wood and chic decor.

Zemi’s opening comes on the heels of facelifts at Malliouhana Hotel & Spa and Cap Juluca, the two Greco-Moorish hotels responsible for placing Anguilla on the jet-set map in the mid-1980s. The new Malliouhana Resort & Spa, reimagined by the teams at SB Architects and TAL Studio, now stands as a 46-room boutique property of Auberge Resorts Collection pedigree, while Cap Juluca struts a rejuvenated edge with more modern decor and a newly constructed presidential suite equivalent, the 3,290-square-foot Jonquil Suite.

Following a renovation, Cap Juluca now marries its Greco-Moorish exterior with more modern interiors.

In October, the design-driven Viceroy Anguilla will reopen after a two-month makeover as the Four Seasons Resort and Private Residences Anguilla. The resort will retain its Caribbean-cool vibe and Kelly Wearstler interiors while implementing Four Seasons–caliber service and excellent food and wine offerings. To accommodate Anguilla’s new wave of luxe inventory, Tradewind Aviation has started servicing Anguilla directly from Puerto Rico on a fleet of contemporary Pilatus PC-12s.

In the late-nineteenth century, Bermuda’s aquamarine coastlines were deemed fit for royalty—a princess to be exact—when Queen Victoria’s daughter, Princess Louise, fell in love with the natural beauty of this petite British colony. The Princess Hotel, named in Louise’s honor, opened in 1885 and attracted the who’s who of the early-twentieth-century global elite. Flash-forward 131 years, and this history-steeped hotel, rechristened the Hamilton Princess & Beach Club, is penning a new chapter after a $100-million refresh.

Interior at Marcus’. (Photo by Nicole Franzen) Dessert at Marcus’. (Photo by Nicole Franzen)

Though the traditional, salmon-tinted exteriors of the 400-key resort remain, the interior is a different story. The hotel’s new modern art collection comprises 60 museum-quality works strewn across the property, starting with the gallery-like lobby, adorned with art by Tom Wesselmann and Andy Warhol. While all accommodations have been renovated, 43 have been converted into larger guest suites at the hands of Botelho Wood Architects. Of the three new restaurants, don’t miss Marcus’, Bermuda’s first and only celebrity-chef restaurant. The sleek eatery showcases Bermudian cuisine as interpreted by James Beard Award–winning chef Marcus Samuelsson, with signature dishes like trout roe tacos and fish chowder croquettes dotting the menu. A new Exhale Spa offers the wellness brand’s flagship treatments and fitness classes and flanks an adults-only spa pool, a quieter alternative to the resort’s main harborside infinity pool.

In anticipation of hosting the thirty-fifth America’s Cup next summer, Hamilton Princess & Beach Club has also supersized its marina to become the island’s first and only full-service marina, accommodating up to 60 water toys. But it needn’t be race time to enjoy an afternoon on a super-yacht, catamaran, or fishing boat. Many of these glossy ships work with the resort for pursuits in the island’s cove-laced, pink-sanded water world.

The resort’s marina is well equipped for aquatic pursuits. (Photo courtesy of Hamilton Princess & Beach Club)

We can never get enough of St. Barths—our favorite St. Tropez–inspired sliver of the French West Indies—so we’ve rounded up a few fabulous and timely excuses for your next dose of European glamour, five-star pampering, and incredible gastronomy.

This year’s top pretext: Visit the island’s newest and most coveted resort product, the Christopher Columbus Suite at the Eden Rock – St. Barths. This 2,200-square-foot sanctuary, named after the island’s founder, is a glass-encased jewel box that sits atop the hotel promontory, strewn with Italian furnishings, pop art, and views of St. Jean Bay. Island regulars will recognize the space as the former lobby, which was moved beachside to accommodate this architectural masterpiece.

Exterior and interior of the Eden Rock’s Christopher Columbus Suite.

Over on the island’s easterly reaches, Le Guanahani is also paying homage to Columbus’ voyage to the New World with the nautical-themed Admiral Suite, the final touch of the famed resort’s $40-million refurbishment and expansion. The suite perches by Grand Cul-de-Sac bay and features wrap-around balconies and direct beach access.

Interior of Le Guanahani’s Admiral Suite. Bites from the St. Barths Gourmet Festival.

Foodies now can add another annual pilgrimage to their calendar: the St. Barths Gourmet Festival.

In just three years, this wine and food festival has grown into a spectacular happening with internationally acclaimed chefs taking over the island’s most popular restaurants at ticketed events boasting French-Creole fusions and wine pairings.

The 2016 festival, scheduled for November 3-6, will be headlined by celebrity Parisian chef Christian Le Squer, who, earlier this year, received three Michelin stars for his Le Cinq restaurant at the Four Seasons Hotel George V in Paris.


Bermuda’s Hottest New Restaurant Gets An Opening Date

Marcus&rsquo, the new restaurant by famed chef Marcus Samuelsson, opens at Bermuda&rsquos Hamilton Princess & Beach Club (formerly the Fairmont Hamilton Princess) on May 27.

The menu will feature the chef&rsquos signature style of globally-influenced cuisine, using local ingredients and incorporating the Caribbean influences that distinguish the Atlantic island.

To celebrate the restaurant&rsquos opening and the start of the summer season, the resort will offer three special packages (from $549 per night) that include signed copies of Samuelsson&rsquos book, Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook At Home.

Marcus&rsquo is part of the resort&rsquos recent $90-million renovation.


Treasured Islands: Anguilla, Bermuda, and St. Barths

West Indian glamour debuted a new address in February on the most sparkling of Anguilla’s 33 ultra-turquoise beaches, Shoal Bay East. Say hello to Zemi Beach House Resort & Spa, a collection of low-rise mansions designed by celebrated Caribbean architect Lane Pettigrew and cast over 6 acres and a near quarter-mile of beachfront. Sixty-three guest rooms seduce with a blend of dark and light woods, an earth-tone palette, and floor-to-ceiling windows that frame Anguilla’s 50 shades of blue. The vistas extend to the beachfront infinity-edge swimming pool and continue at the two seasonal-cuisine waterfront restaurants, which highlight authentic Anguillan flavors and feature local rum on tap.
Zemi Beach House Resort & Spa is Anguilla’s newest luxury property. Zemi’s oceanfront rooms feature a melange of wood and chic decor.

Zemi’s opening comes on the heels of facelifts at Malliouhana Hotel & Spa and Cap Juluca, the two Greco-Moorish hotels responsible for placing Anguilla on the jet-set map in the mid-1980s. The new Malliouhana Resort & Spa, reimagined by the teams at SB Architects and TAL Studio, now stands as a 46-room boutique property of Auberge Resorts Collection pedigree, while Cap Juluca struts a rejuvenated edge with more modern decor and a newly constructed presidential suite equivalent, the 3,290-square-foot Jonquil Suite.
Following a renovation, Cap Juluca now marries its Greco-Moorish exterior with more modern interiors.

In October, the design-driven Viceroy Anguilla will reopen after a two-month makeover as the Four Seasons Resort and Private Residences Anguilla. The resort will retain its Caribbean-cool vibe and Kelly Wearstler interiors while implementing Four Seasons–caliber service and excellent food and wine offerings. To accommodate Anguilla’s new wave of luxe inventory, Tradewind Aviation has started servicing Anguilla directly from Puerto Rico on a fleet of contemporary Pilatus PC-12s.

In the late-nineteenth century, Bermuda’s aquamarine coastlines were deemed fit for royalty—a princess to be exact—when Queen Victoria’s daughter, Princess Louise, fell in love with the natural beauty of this petite British colony. The Princess Hotel, named in Louise’s honor, opened in 1885 and attracted the who’s who of the early-twentieth-century global elite. Flash-forward 131 years, and this history-steeped hotel, rechristened the Hamilton Princess & Beach Club, is penning a new chapter after a $100-million refresh.

Interior at Marcus’. (Photo by Nicole Franzen)

Dessert at Marcus’. (Photo by Nicole Franzen)

Though the traditional, salmon-tinted exteriors of the 400-key resort remain, the interior is a different story. The hotel’s new modern art collection comprises 60 museum-quality works strewn across the property, starting with the gallery-like lobby, adorned with art by Tom Wesselmann and Andy Warhol. While all accommodations have been renovated, 43 have been converted into larger guest suites at the hands of Botelho Wood Architects. Of the three new restaurants, don’t miss Marcus’, Bermuda’s first and only celebrity-chef restaurant. The sleek eatery showcases Bermudian cuisine as interpreted by James Beard Award–winning chef Marcus Samuelsson, with signature dishes like trout roe tacos and fish chowder croquettes dotting the menu. A new Exhale Spa offers the wellness brand’s flagship treatments and fitness classes and flanks an adults-only spa pool, a quieter alternative to the resort’s main harborside infinity pool.

In anticipation of hosting the thirty-fifth America’s Cup next summer, Hamilton Princess & Beach Club has also supersized its marina to become the island’s first and only full-service marina, accommodating up to 60 water toys. But it needn’t be race time to enjoy an afternoon on a super-yacht, catamaran, or fishing boat. Many of these glossy ships work with the resort for pursuits in the island’s cove-laced, pink-sanded water world.
The resort’s marina is well equipped for aquatic pursuits. (Photo courtesy of Hamilton Princess & Beach Club)

We can never get enough of St. Barths—our favorite St. Tropez–inspired sliver of the French West Indies—so we’ve rounded up a few fabulous and timely excuses for your next dose of European glamour, five-star pampering, and incredible gastronomy.

This year’s top pretext: Visit the island’s newest and most coveted resort product, the Christopher Columbus Suite at the Eden Rock – St. Barths. This 2,200-square-foot sanctuary, named after the island’s founder, is a glass-encased jewel box that sits atop the hotel promontory, strewn with Italian furnishings, pop art, and views of St. Jean Bay. Island regulars will recognize the space as the former lobby, which was moved beachside to accommodate this architectural masterpiece.
Exterior and interior of the Eden Rock’s Christopher Columbus Suite.

Over on the island’s easterly reaches, Le Guanahani is also paying homage to Columbus’ voyage to the New World with the nautical-themed Admiral Suite, the final touch of the famed resort’s $40-million refurbishment and expansion. The suite perches by Grand Cul-de-Sac bay and features wrap-around balconies and direct beach access.
Interior of Le Guanahani’s Admiral Suite. Bites from the St. Barths Gourmet Festival.

Foodies now can add another annual pilgrimage to their calendar: the St. Barths Gourmet Festival.

In just three years, this wine and food festival has grown into a spectacular happening with internationally acclaimed chefs taking over the island’s most popular restaurants at ticketed events boasting French-Creole fusions and wine pairings.

The 2016 festival, scheduled for November 3-6, will be headlined by celebrity Parisian chef Christian Le Squer, who, earlier this year, received three Michelin stars for his Le Cinq restaurant at the Four Seasons Hotel George V in Paris.


Chef Samuelsson To Host Dinner On Wednesday

Hamilton Princess & Beach Club today [March 13] announces that Chef Marcus Samuelsson will be hosting a dinner on Wednesday, March 15 to promote his new cookbook.

The celebrity chef will be cooking some of his favourite dishes from his latest cook book ‘The Red Rooster Cookbook: The Story of Food and Hustle in Harlem’ at Marcus’ before taking the time to meet and greet fans.

Marcus Samuelsson said: “I’m looking forward to visiting Bermuda and cooking the food I love for old and new friends. Everything on the menu is featured in my latest cookbook. I want to show people that eating is about so much more than what is on your plate. I love to create a vibrant dining experience where everyone is having a good time.”

His latest cookbook looks beyond food and celebrates the neighbourhood. It has playlists for chapters and features stories of the Harlem community alongside the recipes.

Allan Federer, General Manager at Hamilton Princess & Beach Club, said: “We are very much looking forward to welcoming Marcus back to Bermuda and we know guests won’t be disappointed when he cooks with the recipes hand-picked from his new cook book.”

Welcome cocktails at Marcus’ dinner will include Yes Chef, The Brownstoner, The Savoy and the Dark and Stormier.

Hors ‘oeurvres of Charred Char Arepas, La Marqueta Pork Tack Tack with Jerk Bacon and Devil Eggs With Chicken Skin Mayo will be served.

The set menu will be Squash Salad with Crunch Quinoa, Coconut Ceviche, Obama Short Rib with Mac and Greens and Fried Brussel Sprouts With Bacon Dip, followed by Rum Cake.

Cocktails are at 7pm, with the four-course dinner starting at 8pm. Tickets cost $85 plus gratuities per person – they are limited and available on a first come, first served basis. They are available to buy at www.ptix.bm

Marcus’ re-opened its doors on March 9 with a fresh new look and menu. The popular restaurant underwent a refresh in February to remove the wall behind the bar and open up the restaurant’s already spectacular views even more.

For more information on Marcus’ visit the website here or find out more @Marcuscooks or #RedRoosterCookbook on social media.

The restaurant is open for lunch from 12pm to 3pm, dinner from 6pm to 10pm and late-night dining from 10pm to 12am. Champagne brunch is served on Sundays from 12pm to 3pm.


Watch the video: #AskGaryVee Episode 18: The Ultimate Drug (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Dazilkree

    wonderfully, it's the entertaining piece

  2. Juramar

    I, sorry, but am certainly not everything. Are there other variations?

  3. Scur

    What a funny question

  4. Menw

    I will abstain from comments.



Write a message